Farm Brewery Progressing Across From Hagerstown’s Leitersburg Cinemas

20045418_246403285876135_2646795852680266627_oWASHINGTON COUNTY, Md. — A new farm brewery on Leitersburg Pike north of Hagerstown is getting closer to opening.

Upper Stem Farm Brewery was issued electrical permits to start electrical work on its tasting room at 20150 Leitersburg Pike, Hagerstown, according to permit records. The property is located across the road from the entrance to Leitersburg Cinemas. The farm brewery has been in the works for some time and with any independent micro-brewery, there will always be delays.

Owners are listed as Jean Fentress and Dan Wingerd, according to the permit application.

The Herald-Mail reported on Wingerd’s initial inquiry in front of the Washington County Liquor Board in 2015 before he purchased the property. The newspaper also provided background on Wingerd:

Born and raised in Hagerstown, Wingerd said he graduated from North Hagerstown High School. He moved to Montgomery County and retired last year from his job in the computer industry, he said.

“My wife and I plan to move back here,” he said.

He earned a master brewer certificate before retiring and worked as an assistant brewer at a microbrewery in Frederick, Md., for three years, Wingerd said.

 

An opening date has not been announced, but the hours listed on the permit for when Upper Stem opens will be 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 1 to 8 p.m. Saturday and 1 to 6 p.m. Sunday. Farm breweries are restricted to limited hours, especially during the week, because of how the farm brewery license is set up. They typically can be granted an extension if holding a special event.

Farm brewery licenses were created by the state of Maryland in 2012, creating an opportunity for farms to grow ingredients on site to be brewed into beer.

Follow the progress of Upper Stem Farm Brewery on its Facebook page.

—Charles Schelle

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En Vogue In The Burg

The diverse student population at Frostburg State University is creating some exciting opportunities for students they are bringing here from the city.

Modeling and a general interest in fashion is one of them. It’s an interesting intersection of the country meets the city, with two distinct modeling clubs at FSU. Both clubs are thriving in their own ways and are producing successful alumni. It’s really incredible considering FSU does not have any fashion programs, whether it be design or merchandising.

This story, appearing in the latest edition of Profile, focuses on one alumna, Imena de Barros, who you’ve might have seen in your Sunday paper. Click on the story link for a related sidebar on two other fashionable alumni.

 

IMENA LIKE WOW:
ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF VISUAL COUTURE LIVING HER DREAM LIFE

By Charles Schelle

Every day is a bit of a surprise for Imena de Barros ’12.
At 5 p.m., she has her schedule for the following day in her hand. Is it a shoot for Macy’s? Footwear casting call? A ight to Europe for work? No wonder her Instagram handle is @Imenalikewow.

The easy-going Bobcat is in the Big Apple now, living the not-easy life as a professional model.

But before she started getting calls to model on the department store circuit in ads for Belk, Bon- Ton, Kohl’s, Macy’s, Sears and Target, de Barros earned her busi- ness degree from FSU, a backup plan after she was told in high school that modeling was not in her future. Coming to FSU eased that initial pressure and opened up doors.

“I honestly fell in love with Frostburg the moment I got there,” she said.

A willing learner, she knew what she wanted to get out of her classes.

“I was the person sitting in front of the class, eager to learn and wanting to be there,” she said. “One time a teacher tried to put me in the back, and I was like, ‘Yeah, no.’ I had to talk to him after class. ‘Dude, I’m a nerd! I have to be in the front!’”

That thirst for knowledge prepared her to enter one of the most competitive occupations in the world, where clients have strict needs from their models, including height, weight, hairstyle and smile, to serve their carefully calculated advertising campaigns.

“I try to be as approachable as possible,” she said. “I try to be as open-minded and free- spirited, doing whatever it takes to make the client happy.”

Building Confidence

Before turning pro, de Barros was part of a budding fashion scene at FSU. at scene has since taken hold, and

the campus now has two active and distinct student organizations focused on fashion, Visual Couture Runway Modeling and Paparazzi Perfect.

De Barros’ early involvement with Visual Couture as a founding member is a memory that she’ll carry with her the rest of her life, including meeting her best friends there. It’s also how she met her boyfriend, Alexander Dominguez ’12, who also models professionally.

“We were best friends in college, and we never thought that we would be doing this together,” she said.

The clubs also serve as a formi- dable training ground for future models.

“It gives you an opportunity to express yourself,” de Barros said. “A lot of people in the fashion industry are very creative. … It de nitely broke me out of my shell.”

For example, Visual Couture o ers Couture Clinics to train members on new techniques. It helps the young women and men involved build con dence.

“We spend time building con – dence through how you walk, how you talk, how you show yourself through those looks,” said Visual Couture president Elizabeth Morafa, a senior. “We’re all about con dence through fashion.”

The Business of Being a Model

Before de Barros earned her degree, she ew to South Beach during her senior year spring break to make one last go of becoming a professional.

“I went to every single modeling agency that came to mind. I did a lot of research and everyone said no again,” de Barros said. “Except on my very last day, the very last agency I went to was Next. They gave me a contract on the spot, and I cried like a baby!”

She soon left Miami for her rst job, modeling for German retailer Otto.

De Barros needs representa- tion in each market. Agencies coordinate to avoid con icts or seek higher-paying gigs. De Barros is also represented by Wilhelmenia in Miami, MGM in Hamburg, Germany, and Q Management in New York and Los Angeles.

Passport to Her Dreams

While she already had the bub- bly personality and good genes, FSU helped prepare de Barros.

Promoting student events for the Social Marketing Team enhanced her experience, too.

“When I was with Missy Martz ’95, we were always on Twitter, trying to get the campus com- munity involved,” de Barros said. “Taking what she taught us in a small community and applying it to the world, I have to get every- body on my side and not just a small community like Frostburg.”

Managing social media is part of her job, and in some cases, it a ects whether she will get a job. De Barros has more than 8,000 followers on Instagram. For some, that’s perfect because that number tells clients that she has a local
or regional audience. For others, they demand at least 10,000 followers before considering a model.

rough it all, De Barros feels like she’s living the dream, feeling those “Is this real?” moments traveling to exotic locales like
the Maldives and Mauritius. She needs a new passport now from all of her traveling, and she hopes someday a shoot with Victoria’s Secret or Sports Illustrated is in the o ng.

“I’ve never been happier in my life,” she said. “I am so thankful to be able to wake up and do something that I love.”

It’s good to be Imena.

Training To Be A Diplomat? Attend Frostburg State

You just don’t become a diplomat. It takes special experiences and training.

It turns out that Frostburg State University’s Model Organization of American States course might be the perfect place to get started. Here’s my story that was published in the latest issue of Profile magazine, the Alumni magazine for Frostburg State University.

The story published with a Q-and-A with alumnus Justin van Fleet ’02, who personifies this course experience. You can read the complete Q-and-A on the Frostburg.edu website.

DIPLOMATS IN TRAINING: FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENTS MASTER DIPLOMACY IN D.C

By Charles Schelle

Across the street from the Washington Monument, Frostburg State University student CJ Barnett struck up a conversation with anyone he could see in the sunlit grand hall of the Organization of American States’ main building.

The mammoth room quickly became an intimate affair as Barnett, from Elkton, Md., worked to get to know other students so he could persuade them to take his side in the discussions to come. To the strangers he met, Barnett wasn’t representing FSU. He was representing the nation of Colombia, leading the delegation in this real-world diplomatic exercise, the 2017 Washington Model Organization of American States (OAS) General Assembly for Universities.

“Talking to the people is honestly my favorite part,” the political science major said. “I’ve enjoyed every second of meeting with people from all different backgrounds, all different cultures.”

Not every student is so at ease in large social settings, but even if they have the gift of gab, they had better be prepared to speak about policy, too.

“It was a stressful nightmare,” political science major Cameron Shanton said, smiling as he recalled his first year at the Model OAS. “Slowly, you get used to it. It’s like being thrown into a massive social situation. Anyone would be uncomfortable. You have to speak in front of everyone and convince them of your viewpoint,” said the Thurmont, Md., resident.

Those nightmares quickly turn into a dream week for students. Public speaking is just one of the lessons learned during the weeklong simulation, promoting democracy through diplomacy. It’s the hallmark experience of the FSU Political Science 435 course, Model Organization of American States.

“You do everything a diplomat would do,” said A’Lexus Blue, who earned her political science degree in May. “That’s meeting with other members, talking about bilateral agreements, multilateral agreements.” The Accokeek, Md., resident said time was also required to discuss  United Nations documents and merge them.

The OAS, headquartered in the nation’s capital, is the world’s longest-running regional political union, promoting democracy and defending human rights among member nations in the Western Hemisphere. The event is coordinated with the Institute for Diplomatic Dialogue in the Americas and provides a simulated environment for college students to conduct diplomatic negotiations, as well as handle a surprise crisis scenario announced during opening day.

Barnett, Blue and Shanton were joined by students Jessica Johnson Clay of Cockeysville, Md.; Omar Taylor of Salisbury, Md., who also graduated in May; and Will Woodcock of Columbia, Md.

A Mental and Social Exercise

Being book smart will serve students well at the Washington Model OAS General Assembly. That knowledge has to be expressed in a friendly and strategic way at a dais or in one-on-one chats called unmoderated caucuses. The students had their own topics of concentration in committees that deal with democratization, poverty, human rights or drugs.

Political Science Professor Dr. Joan Serafin Andorfer has been the president of the Institute for Diplomatic Dialogue in the Americas since 2000, and serves as a co-organizer of the Model OAS. FSU has sent students to the Model OAS for more than 30 years. Andorfer has witnessed students blossom at the Model OAS, realizing their dreams by solving problems on their own.

“Our students see that they have talents that they didn’t realize they had, or talents they want to acquire,” Andorfer said. “They see there is a place in the world for them to make a difference. I try to teach that in the classroom, but until they actually experience it, they really don’t see how it can be so valuable.”

Before students arrive in OAS, they spend the semester learning about the history of the country they represent, researching modern-day policies of the country, preparing draft resolutions and learning how to conduct themselves in the meetings. It all can feel abstract until a student is faced with a microphone while surrounded by hundreds of peers, having to adjust strategy on the fly.

“Studying for Colombia and the various policies isn’t the hard part,” Barnett said. “The hard part is understanding how every single other state within the OAS is going to respond.”

“If you really have great ideas, you have to be able to communicate them in a language everybody can understand,” Andorfer said. “When they get here, they realize a misplaced comma can be diabolical to what they’re trying to achieve.”

A Global Perspective

FSU students in the class are seeing already how the course and trip will help them during their next steps.

Woodcock wants to attend law school and work for a nonprofit dedicated to protecting animals. He anticipates the Model OAS experience will help him bridge divides.

“It gives you a broader range of knowledge of where people come from, what they expect and what’s expected of them,” Woodcock said. “Hopefully, that will help me interact with people from different cultures.”

Taylor, a law and society major concentrating in criminal justice, found it reassuring that students from the real Colombia indicated that he was on the right track with his resolution for judicial reform on drug use by expanding rehabilitation. He’s feeling optimistic, as he wants to go into a career involving international politics.

“It helps that I have some expertise in diplomacy,” Taylor said.

In the end, FSU as Colombia’s resolution passed 18-9.

The Model OAS experience is supported through Opportunity Grants, which are made possible through gifts to the FSU Foundation’s Annual Fund. To support experiences like this one, visit www.frostburg.edu/foundation/ways-to-give or call 301-687-4161.